AI

Taking a good idea to the bank: DrugBank

Taking a good idea to the bank: DrugBank

When DrugBank launched three years ago, it wasn’t exactly brand-new. The online database had started in 2005 as a research project in the lab of U of A computing science professor Dr. David Wishart. Company co-founders Craig Knox and Mike Wilson had helped develop the tool as undergraduates and watched it grow into a leading Internet resource for free drug information.

“The first weekend we released it, the servers crashed because there was so much traffic coming in,” explains Craig Knox. “It was quite popular and grew in its popularity over the years.” Over the next decade, DrugBank became ubiquitous in the pharma world, with millions of global users ranging from university researchers and students to health professionals like pharmacists and physicians, and even members of the general public. The resource also attracted the attention of pharmaceutical and health information businesses.

Frettable | Note-worthy app brings AI to the masses

Frettable | Note-worthy app brings AI to the masses

Like so many inventions, Frettable was born out of necessity.

Greg Burlet dreamt up the artificial intelligence-driven music transcription service after his bandmate moved to B.C.

Still wanting to write music together, the duo started emailing audio files back and forth. The lack of visuals made collaborating difficult, so they tried pointing webcams at their fretboards instead. This too was unsuccessful.

“There was so much lag and the audio quality wasn’t great,” Burlet says.

A University of Alberta undergrad at the time, Burlet had recently taken an introductory class on machine learning and thought: what if a program could recognize the notes played and automatically transcribe them into sheet music or tabulations? It would work like speech recognition, but for music.

Member Update | Gfycat Uses Artificial Intelligence to Fight Deepfakes Porn

Member Update | Gfycat Uses Artificial Intelligence to Fight Deepfakes Porn

We do a lot of student tours of our space and one thing we can count on like clockwork is the astonished reaction from students when they find out Gfycat is an Edmonton-founded company that has deep roots in the community. Gfycat lets you create, discover and share awesome GIFs, amazing moments and funny reactions. If you see a GIF on Reddit, it's most likely powered by Gfycat. 

This week, WIRED covered the strides our friends are making to identify a form of AI technology called deepfakes. Deepfakes are videos that use AI to paste a celebrity face onto someone else's body in a video with uncanny accuracy. When it comes to celebrity or revenge porn, according to SARAH RENSE in Esquire it's legal quicksand. "Legally, there is little protection against deepfakes because the body doing the act isn't the celebrity's own. These videos aren't made from illegally stolen nudes, and as Wired wrote, "You can’t sue someone for exposing the intimate details of your life when it’s not your life they’re exposing." You can even drag the First Amendment into it, defending deepfakes as art, satire, and "free speech" because they weren't technically created illegally." 
 

Image: Wired, February 14, 2018. Photo Credit: HOTLITTLEPOTAT